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Quake 3, and thus Urban Terror, uses 7-bit ASCII for text, including chat and radio messages. This limits the characters you can successfully use to those in the following table. Note that you can't use the semicolon ( ; ) or quote ( " ) in chat, as these characters have special meaning in the game code. As a substitute for double-quote marks, simply type two single-quotes ( ' ). You can use unicode characters in some clients, such as r00t's build, but keep in mind that users of the default client will not be able to see your messages; only other users of clients with unicode support will know what you're saying.

7-bit ASCIIEdit

Decimal Octal Hex Binary Value Description
000 000 0x00 00000000 NUL (Null char.)
001 001 0x01 00000001 SOH (Start of Header)
002 002 0x02 00000010 STX (Start of Text)
003 003 0x03 00000011 ETX (End of Text)
004 004 0x04 00000100 EOT (End of Transmission)
005 005 0x05 00000101 ENQ (Enquiry)
006 006 0x06 00000110 ACK (Acknowledgment)
007 007 0x07 00000111 BEL (Bell)
008 010 0x08 00001000 BS (Backspace)
009 011 0x09 00001001 HT (Horizontal Tab)
010 012 0x0A 00001010 LF (Line Feed)
011 013 0x0B 00001011 VT (Vertical Tab)
012 014 0x0C 00001100 FF (Form Feed)
013 015 0x0D 00001101 CR (Carriage Return)
014 016 0x0E 00001110 SO (Shift Out)
015 017 0x0F 00001111 SI (Shift In)
016 020 0x10 00010000 DLE (Data Link Escape)
017 021 0x11 00010001 DC1 (XON) (Device Control 1)
018 022 0x12 00010010 DC2 (Device Control 2)
019 023 0x13 00010011 DC3 (XOFF)(Device Control 3)
020 024 0x14 00010100 DC4 (Device Control 4)
021 025 0x15 00010101 NAK (Negative Acknowledgement)
022 026 0x16 00010110 SYN (Synchronous Idle)
023 027 0x17 00010111 ETB (End of Trans. Block)
024 030 0x18 00011000 CAN (Cancel)
025 031 0x19 00011001 EM (End of Medium)
026 032 0x1A 00011010 SUB (Substitute)
027 033 0x1B 00011011 ESC (Escape)
028 034 0x1C 00011100 FS (File Separator)
029 035 0x1D 00011101 GS (Group Separator)
030 036 0x1E 00011110 RS (Request to Send)(Record Separator)
031 037 0x1F 00011111 US (Unit Separator)
032 040 0x20 00100000 SP (Space)
033 041 0x21 00100001 ! (exclamation mark)
034 042 0x22 00100010 " (double quote)
035 043 0x23 00100011 # (number sign)
036 044 0x24 00100100 $ (dollar sign)
037 045 0x25 00100101 % (percent)
038 046 0x26 00100110 & (ampersand)
039 047 0x27 00100111 '' (single quote)
040 050 0x28 00101000 ( (left/opening parenthesis)
041 051 0x29 00101001 ) (right/closing parenthesis)
042 052 0x2A 00101010 * (asterisk)
043 053 0x2B 00101011 + (plus)
044 054 0x2C 00101100 , (comma)
045 055 0x2D 00101101 - (minus or dash)
046 056 0x2E 00101110 . (dot)
047 057 0x2F 00101111 / (forward slash)
048 060 0x30 00110000 0
049 061 0x31 00110001 1
050 062 0x32 00110010 2
051 063 0x33 00110011 3
052 064 0x34 00110100 4
053 065 0x35 00110101 5
054 066 0x36 00110110 6
055 067 0x37 00110111 7
056 070 0x38 00111000 8
057 071 0x39 00111001 9
058 072 0x3A 00111010 : (colon)
059 073 0x3B 00111011 ; (semi-colon)
060 074 0x3C 00111100 < (less than)
061 075 0x3D 00111101 = (equal sign)
062 076 0x3E 00111110 > (greater than)
063 077 0x3F 00111111 ? (question mark)
064 100 0x40 01000000 @ (AT symbol)
065 101 0x41 01000001 A
066 102 0x42 01000010 B
067 103 0x43 01000011 C
068 104 0x44 01000100 D
069 105 0x45 01000101 E
070 106 0x46 01000110 F
071 107 0x47 01000111 G
072 110 0x48 01001000 H
073 111 0x49 01001001 I
074 112 0x4A 01001010 J
075 113 0x4B 01001011 K
076 114 0x4C 01001100 L
077 115 0x4D 01001101 M
078 116 0x4E 01001110 N
079 117 0x4F 01001111 O
080 120 0x50 01010000 P
081 121 0x51 01010001 Q
082 122 0x52 01010010 R
083 123 0x53 01010011 S
084 124 0x54 01010100 T
085 125 0x55 01010101 U
086 126 0x56 01010110 V
087 127 0x57 01010111 W
088 130 0x58 01011000 X
089 131 0x59 01011001 Y
090 132 0x5A 01011010 Z
091 133 0x5B 01011011 [ (left/opening bracket)
092 134 0x5C 01011100 \ (back slash)
093 135 0x5D 01011101 ] (right/closing bracket)
094 136 0x5E 01011110 ^ (caret/circumflex)
095 137 0x5F 01011111 _ (underscore)
096 140 0x60 01100000 ` (grave accent)
097 141 0x61 01100001 a
098 142 0x62 01100010 b
099 143 0x63 01100011 c
100 144 0x64 01100100 d
101 145 0x65 01100101 e
102 146 0x66 01100110 f
103 147 0x67 01100111 g
104 150 0x68 01101000 h
105 151 0x69 01101001 i
106 152 0x6A 01101010 j
107 153 0x6B 01101011 k
108 154 0x6C 01101100 l
109 155 0x6D 01101101 m
110 156 0x6E 01101110 n
111 157 0x6F 01101111 o
112 160 0x70 01110000 p
113 161 0x71 01110001 q
114 162 0x72 01110010 r
115 163 0x73 01110011 s
116 164 0x74 01110100 t
117 165 0x75 01110101 u
118 166 0x76 01110110 v
119 167 0x77 01110111 w
120 170 0x78 01111000 x
121 171 0x79 01111001 y
122 172 0x7A 01111010 z
123 173 0x7B 01111011 { (left/opening brace)
124 174 0x7C 01111100 | (vertical bar)
125 175 0x7D 01111101 } (right/closing brace)
126 176 0x7E 01111110 ~ (tilde)
127 177 0x7F 01111111 DEL (delete)

About 7-bit ASCIIEdit

From early in its development, ASCII was intended to be just one of several national variants of an international character code standard, ultimately published as ISO/IEC 646 (1972), which would share most characters in common but assign other locally useful characters to several code points reserved for "national use." However, the four years that elapsed between the publication of ASCII-1963 and ISO's first acceptance of an international recommendation during 1967 caused ASCII's choices for the national use characters to seem to be de facto standards for the world, causing confusion and incompatibility once other countries did begin to make their own assignments to these code points.

ISO/IEC 646, like ASCII, was a 7-bit character set. It did not make any additional codes available, so the same code points encoded different characters in different countries. Escape codes were defined to indicate which national variant applied to a piece of text, but they were rarely used, so it was often impossible to know what variant to work with and therefore which character a code represented, and in general text-processing systems could cope with only one variant anyway.

Because the bracket and brace characters of ASCII were assigned to "national use" code points that were used for accented letters in other national variants of ISO/IEC 646, a German, French, or Swedish, etc. programmer using their national variant of ISO/IEC 646, rather than ASCII, had to write, and thus read, something such as

ä aÄiÜ='Ön'; ü

instead of

{ a[i]='\n'; }

C trigraphs were created to solve this problem for ANSI C, although their late introduction and inconsistent implementation in compilers limited their use. Many programmers kept their computers on US-ASCII, so plain-text in Swedish, German etc. (for example, in e-mail or Usenet) contained "{, }" and similar variants in the middle of words, something those programmers got used to.


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